Horse Teeth And Oral Cavity

Teeth And Oral Cavity System And Diseases In Horses

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Topics

*An Introduction To Horse Teeth And Oral Cavity System And Diseases

This subject is divided into sections organized by teeth (incisors, cheek teeth, canines), the oral cavity and the skull pertaining to the teeth.  There is also the aging project where I took about 8 to 10 horses with documented ages in groups from 3 years to 30+ years (about 225 horses).  I photographed the incisors from both sides, from the front and from the open mouth onto the lower occlusal surfaces (about 900 photos).  These are grouped into views from all ages and also into ages with each view per age group.  Interesting results were seen but basically I now only age horses by their teeth into 4 groups: young, young adult, adult and senior.  Being any more accurate than this is not feasible though you can be close.

read more

Canine Calculus

Calculus is the accumulation of saliva and food debris that hardens and forms a crust on a tooth. Here it is formed on the canines of some male horses.

read more

Canine Debris

Calculus on canines are usually uniform, but in some horses, more feed becomes entrapped in the crusty material.

read more

Canine Decay And EOTRH

Canines in some older horses lose their integrity and decay. This is often associated with EOTRH but can also be from trauma.

read more

Canine Fractures

These teeth of male horses sometimes are placed against something harder, such as a steel stall bar. The result is fracture of the canine.

read more

Canines Just Erupting

Canine teeth of male horses (and occasionally females) can erupt anytime, but most commonly from before birth to 3 years of age.

read more

Cheek Teeth Calculus

Some horses accumulate saliva and feed in the sides of their cheeks that turns to hard calculus on the cheek sides of the first 1 to 3 cheek teeth.

read more

Cheek Teeth Cap Remnants

Deciduous teeth (“Caps”) of young horses attach themselves to the underlying permanent tooth with tips of tooth. These often break off and remain between the permanent tooth and the gum like a kernel of pop corn stuck between your tooth and gum.

read more

Cheek Teeth Caps

The 12 premolar cheek teeth have precursor deciduous teeth (caps). The 12 molar cheek teeth do not have deciduous teeth.

read more

Cheek Teeth End Stage

Cheek teeth have a finite lifespan and when they run out of reserve crown, there is nothing left to hold them in. These are end stage teeth.

read more

Cheek Teeth Eruption Bumps

When the permanent premolar cheek teeth push into position, they often cause lumps that appear on the face and lower jaw. These are normal and are not painful.

read more

Cheek Teeth Hooks

Hooks are the over-eruption of a tooth and are seen when there is no opposition in chewing.

read more

Cheek Teeth Waves

An uneven occlusal surface along the arcade of cheek teeth is commonly called a wave. Some feel that the unevenness needs to be leveled however in my experience, it does not.

read more

Dental Speculum Injury

The use of the speculum is common in equine dentistry. There are reports of damage to the horse caused by them and this is one of those cases.

read more

Flabby Cheeks Of The Oral Cavity

Flabby Cheeks is the description of excessive tissue that lays in front of the first lower cheek teeth of horses. It is one of the three major reasons for bit difficulties and bit rejection as well as one of the primary causes of difficult floating in horses.

read more

Incisor Absence

The nipper teeth can be missing from 1) never being there, 2) the cap is gone and the permanent tooth has not erupted yet, 3) trauma, and 4) extraction.

read more

Incisor Calculus

Accumulation of saliva with feed is very common on the canines but not that common on incisors.

read more

Incisor Caps

All incisors have a precursor deciduous tooth that is displaced and ejected by the erupting permanent tooth below it.

read more

Incisor Damage

Damage is common to the incisors because one of the primary purposes of these teeth is defense.

read more

Incisor Relaxed Space

When a horse is relaxed, their incisors are kept apart as seen in these photos. On average a horse chews 25,000 times a day. If each chew takes 1 second, then all the teeth are kept out of occlusion 71% of the day.

read more

Incisor Trauma

These picture show trauma of an incisor from about 2 years earlier and the removal of the damaged tooth.

read more

Incisor Tumors

This was thought to be a benign tumor (abnormal growth) of an incisor. It was extracted and shown to be a deciduous incisor that was malformed (the definition of a tumor).

read more

Incisor Wear

The primary wearing factor of the incisors, including length and pattern of wear, is the movement of the tongue over the occlusal surfaces. This is called stropping.

read more

Oral Cavity Growths

On occasion, a growth occurs within the mouth that is benign and just a passing observation. Rarely do they affect the horse unlest they enlarge and cause either pain or restrict the chewing movement.

read more

Oral Cavity Trauma

Whenever trauma occurs inside the mouth of the horse, the reaction from the horse can be anywhere from nothing at all to drooling and an inability to chew.

read more

Parrot Mouth

Parrot mouth only affects the relationship of the incisors to each other where the upper incisors are more forward than the lower incisors and completely miss on occlusion. The cheek teeth are not affected.

read more

Sow Mouth

Sow mouth only affects the relationship of the incisors to each other where the lower incisors are more forward than the upper incisors and completely miss on occlusion. The cheek teeth are not affected.

read more

The Palate

The palate is the tissue dividing the mouth from the airway above it. It is divided into the hard and soft portions.

read more

Vesicular Stomatitis

go down to related material   Topic There is no topic material. Related Material Images, if any, for this topic are in a gallery located at the bottom of this page.   Back To Horse Systems and Diseases Topics Back To Teeth and Oral Cavity System and Diseases...

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Wolf Teeth Blind

When a wolf tooth in a horse doesn’t erupt through the gum, it is called a blind wolf tooth.

read more

Posts

Incisors – A Question From An Owner

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Pull The Tooth!

Please read this first -This post has received a lot of comments. Before you post your question, please read all of the comments at the end to determine if it has already been asked.  Remember, I cannot give you direct advice….. see disclaimer. This week a horse...

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Speechless In A Case Of EOTRH In A Horse

(This blog’s header photo is of a horse that is moderately affected with EOTRH) Every once in a while I become lost for words.  My mind becomes numb and my jaw freezes.  My eyelids slowly sweep moisture across my eyeballs as I try to bring things into focus.  My...

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The Trouble With Dentistry As Seen By A Human Doctor

I came across an article on Dr Joseph Mercola’s website.  He is a functional medical physician who is prolific in content helping humans understand their health.  I discovered him when listening to many podcasts as I search for information that will help our horses...

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What Is The Cause Of EOTRH In Horses?

After the 2017 meeting of the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) featuring Dr Paddy Dixon, the world’s leading expert on dentistry in horses, the cause of EOTRH in horses is still unknown. But I have an idea that merits this blog. Equine Odontoclastic...

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Who Knocked Out My Front Tooth?

The day after Memorial Day. I hope we all paused a moment yesterday to thank our soldiers for their service, commitment, and even their loss of life for our freedoms. If you didn’t, go ahead and thank them now. Then again tomorrow…… Mel and I were in Wellington, FL...

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Podcasts

Cavities In Horse Teeth And More – Podcast #047

I go over some of the recent articles showing up in the magazines and news feeds for horse owners discussing 1) cavities in the cheek teeth of horses and 2) the inhalation of tooth dust from motorized dentistry tools. I read the lay article and then look at the...

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The TMJ Of Horses – Podcast #034

The temporomandibular joints connect the jaw (mandible) to the skull. It is the most active joint in the body of the horse moving on average 25,000 times per day – or 9 million chews per year. It has evolved over the evolution of the horse to be a very sturdy...

read more

Webinars

Topics

*An Introduction To Horse Teeth And Oral Cavity System And Diseases

This subject is divided into sections organized by teeth (incisors, cheek teeth, canines), the oral cavity and the skull pertaining to the teeth.  There is also the aging project where I took about 8 to 10 horses with documented ages in groups from 3 years to 30+ years (about 225 horses).  I photographed the incisors from both sides, from the front and from the open mouth onto the lower occlusal surfaces (about 900 photos).  These are grouped into views from all ages and also into ages with each view per age group.  Interesting results were seen but basically I now only age horses by their teeth into 4 groups: young, young adult, adult and senior.  Being any more accurate than this is not feasible though you can be close.

read more

Canine Calculus

Calculus is the accumulation of saliva and food debris that hardens and forms a crust on a tooth. Here it is formed on the canines of some male horses.

read more

Canine Debris

Calculus on canines are usually uniform, but in some horses, more feed becomes entrapped in the crusty material.

read more

Canine Decay And EOTRH

Canines in some older horses lose their integrity and decay. This is often associated with EOTRH but can also be from trauma.

read more

Canine Fractures

These teeth of male horses sometimes are placed against something harder, such as a steel stall bar. The result is fracture of the canine.

read more

Canines Just Erupting

Canine teeth of male horses (and occasionally females) can erupt anytime, but most commonly from before birth to 3 years of age.

read more

Cheek Teeth Calculus

Some horses accumulate saliva and feed in the sides of their cheeks that turns to hard calculus on the cheek sides of the first 1 to 3 cheek teeth.

read more

Cheek Teeth Cap Remnants

Deciduous teeth (“Caps”) of young horses attach themselves to the underlying permanent tooth with tips of tooth. These often break off and remain between the permanent tooth and the gum like a kernel of pop corn stuck between your tooth and gum.

read more

Cheek Teeth Caps

The 12 premolar cheek teeth have precursor deciduous teeth (caps). The 12 molar cheek teeth do not have deciduous teeth.

read more

Cheek Teeth End Stage

Cheek teeth have a finite lifespan and when they run out of reserve crown, there is nothing left to hold them in. These are end stage teeth.

read more

Cheek Teeth Eruption Bumps

When the permanent premolar cheek teeth push into position, they often cause lumps that appear on the face and lower jaw. These are normal and are not painful.

read more

Cheek Teeth Hooks

Hooks are the over-eruption of a tooth and are seen when there is no opposition in chewing.

read more

Cheek Teeth Waves

An uneven occlusal surface along the arcade of cheek teeth is commonly called a wave. Some feel that the unevenness needs to be leveled however in my experience, it does not.

read more

Dental Speculum Injury

The use of the speculum is common in equine dentistry. There are reports of damage to the horse caused by them and this is one of those cases.

read more

Flabby Cheeks Of The Oral Cavity

Flabby Cheeks is the description of excessive tissue that lays in front of the first lower cheek teeth of horses. It is one of the three major reasons for bit difficulties and bit rejection as well as one of the primary causes of difficult floating in horses.

read more

Incisor Absence

The nipper teeth can be missing from 1) never being there, 2) the cap is gone and the permanent tooth has not erupted yet, 3) trauma, and 4) extraction.

read more

Incisor Calculus

Accumulation of saliva with feed is very common on the canines but not that common on incisors.

read more

Incisor Caps

All incisors have a precursor deciduous tooth that is displaced and ejected by the erupting permanent tooth below it.

read more

Incisor Damage

Damage is common to the incisors because one of the primary purposes of these teeth is defense.

read more

Incisor Relaxed Space

When a horse is relaxed, their incisors are kept apart as seen in these photos. On average a horse chews 25,000 times a day. If each chew takes 1 second, then all the teeth are kept out of occlusion 71% of the day.

read more

Incisor Trauma

These picture show trauma of an incisor from about 2 years earlier and the removal of the damaged tooth.

read more

Incisor Tumors

This was thought to be a benign tumor (abnormal growth) of an incisor. It was extracted and shown to be a deciduous incisor that was malformed (the definition of a tumor).

read more

Incisor Wear

The primary wearing factor of the incisors, including length and pattern of wear, is the movement of the tongue over the occlusal surfaces. This is called stropping.

read more

Oral Cavity Growths

On occasion, a growth occurs within the mouth that is benign and just a passing observation. Rarely do they affect the horse unlest they enlarge and cause either pain or restrict the chewing movement.

read more

Oral Cavity Trauma

Whenever trauma occurs inside the mouth of the horse, the reaction from the horse can be anywhere from nothing at all to drooling and an inability to chew.

read more

Parrot Mouth

Parrot mouth only affects the relationship of the incisors to each other where the upper incisors are more forward than the lower incisors and completely miss on occlusion. The cheek teeth are not affected.

read more

Sow Mouth

Sow mouth only affects the relationship of the incisors to each other where the lower incisors are more forward than the upper incisors and completely miss on occlusion. The cheek teeth are not affected.

read more

The Palate

The palate is the tissue dividing the mouth from the airway above it. It is divided into the hard and soft portions.

read more

Wolf Teeth Blind

When a wolf tooth in a horse doesn’t erupt through the gum, it is called a blind wolf tooth.

read more

Posts

Pull The Tooth!

Please read this first -This post has received a lot of comments. Before you post your question,...

read more

Podcasts

Webinars