Professional Working Areas

Areas dedicated for use by visiting professionals are found in large barns where their activity can be separated from the day-to-day grooming activities or the movement of horses in and out of the barn.  This helps efficiency and workflow.  It also assures the professional a clean and well-lit area to work in out of the weather elements.  Power is readily available, and ventilation, heat and fly control are standard features and a clean floor and a work environment are free of dangerous obstacles.

The most common professional area found on farms is the site for the farrier.  This is usually a place where a truck can be backed up near or underneath an overhang.  Fans constantly run in summer, and heaters and doors keep out the winter cold.

Veterinary areas often incorporate a lab that is well lit, ventilated and free of flies, rodents and weather elements.  I remember one farm I did reproductive work for in upstate New York, where winter could be bitter.  I entered a spotless room larger than three horse stalls with windows that let in the daylight.  It looked like a human doctor’s office.  In the back corner, there was a dutch door (a door with a top and bottom half).  Next to that was a countertop where I would place my ultrasound machine.  The top door opened into a horse stall where a handler positioned the rear end of a mare up against the door.  In the dead of winter and wearing a short-sleeved shirt, I would perform rentals and ultrasounds on many horses.  The lower door was reinforced to prevent damage from any kicking horse.

Most other professionals either use the horse stall or the grooming stall to perform their work.  I prefer using the horse stall with my dental work as this is where they are most comfortable.  In addition, if the horse needs to be medicated, there is no walking the horse back to the stall, which could be dangerous to the horse and handler if the horse falls.

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